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Weekend Link Love – Edition 372

Weekend Link Love

Research of the Week

Replacing fructose with starch helps obese kids improve metabolic health.

Traditional societies have more positive views on aging than modern societies.

Melatonin before bed improves circadian rhythm and sleep efficiency in strength athletes.

Good dates.

Your genes got rhythm.

By second grade, kids who had taken academic pre-K classes were performing worse in school than kids who hadn’t.

New Primal Blueprint Podcasts

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Episode 91: Robert Murphy: Host Brad Kearns sits down with Robert Murphy, economist and co-author of the just-released The Primal Prescriptionto discuss the current dysfunctional state of the US healthcare system, how it might be fixed, and how we can (and often should) opt-out entirely.

Each week, select Mark’s Daily Apple blog posts are prepared as Primal Blueprint Podcasts. Need to catch up on reading, but don’t have the time? Prefer to listen to articles while on the go? Check out the new blog post podcasts below, and subscribe to the Primal Blueprint Podcast here so you never miss an episode.

Also, be sure to check out and subscribe to the Primal Endurance Podcast.

Weekly sweepstakes: Write a review for The Primal Blueprint Podcast or The Primal Endurance Podcast on iTunes and submit this form for a chance to win a Primal prize package. One new winner is chosen every week!

Interesting Blog Posts

23andMe lays out their new services.

One blogger’s take on the fructose children’s study mentioned above.

Media, Schmedia

Is Silicon Valley bad for your health?

South Korean women are embracing fitness.

2% of hot dogs in a recent study contained human DNA. Why this might not matter.

Everything Else

These 10,000 year-old frozen cave lion cubs, amazingly, still look pretty cuddly.

Chimpanzee drumming. Check out that roar at about 1:20 in.

Though I’m not sure it qualifies as a bonafide “food craze,” putting butter on sushi sounds delicious.

This new desk lets you lie down on the job.

How the wild Atlantic salmon was decimated and Alaska has remained a viable wild salmon fishery for so long.

On Black Friday (November 27), REI is closing its stores and paying its employees to get outside.

This is one of the better applications of genetic engineering I’ve seen.

The American Academy of Pediatrics now says iPads and smartphones are appropriate for developing toddlers.

Recipe Corner

Time Capsule

One year ago (Nov 3 – Nov 9)

Comment of the Week

A whole head of garlic? I bet viruses aren’t the only thing you’re warding off after that concoction, Mark. 😉

– Ha! You’re probably right.


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Quick & Easy Salmon Cakes

SalmonCakesFromPracticalPaleo2-2This is a guest post from Diane Sanfilippo, author of Practical Paleo and the wildly popular blog, BalancedBites.com.

Diane often leaves a lot of space to make her recipes your own, and this one is no exception. This recipe can easily be modified to switch up flavors, or for those following a low FODMAP diet.

If you’re looking to dress-up the wild canned salmon you’ve been buying, this is the recipe for you! It’s quick and easy, and it can be made mostly from the ingredients you tend to have on-hand.

Bonus recipe: Use Primal Kitchen™ Mayo to make an amazing dipping sauce/topping for these salmon cakes using the recipe at the bottom of the page.

Yield: 4 patties (2 servings)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cooking Time: 20 minutes

  • 2 6-ounce cans of wild salmon, drained
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 3 tablespoons minced shallots
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, minced or grated
  • 2 tablespoons green onions (scallions), minced
  • 1 teaspoon Savory Spice Blend (see recipe below)
  • 2 teaspoons gluten-free mustard (optional)
  • 1-2 teaspoons coconut flour (optional, may use 1 tablespoon almond flour or other nut/seed flour if you prefer)
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil, ghee, or butter

Savory Spice Blend:

Yield: 5 1/2 tablespoons

  • 1/2 tablespoon rosemary
  • 1/2 tablespoon sage
  • 1 tablespoon coarse sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1/2 tablespoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper

Combine the salmon, eggs, shallots, garlic, green onions, Savory Spice Blend, and mustard (optional) in a small mixing bowl. If the consistency is runny, sift the coconut flour over the mixture, and combine well.

In a large pan over medium heat, melt enough coconut oil to create a layer about 1/4-inch thick. Form the salmon mixture into 4 equally sized patties, and place them in the pan, all at once or two at a time. Allow the patties to brown on one side before flipping and cook all the way through.

Serve warm or cold as leftovers.

Dipping Sauce:

  • 1/4 cup Primal Kitchen Mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons chopped dill pickles
  • a few pinches of chopped fresh dill (or use dried dill)
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste

Change It Up!

Change the seasonings for a new taste experience—try a Curry Spice Blend instead of Savory.

FODMAP Free?

Leave out the shallots, garlic, and green onions—season with extra fresh herbs. Do not use the coconut flour or coconut oil.

SalmonCakesFromPracticalPaleo2-2

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Announcing The Healing Kitchen…and a HUGE Giveaway

I am so excited to announce the arrival of my newest book, The Healing Kitchen!!!

THK Cover

This amazing new AIP cookbook, which releases Dec. 15, is a collaboration with my fellow blogger and dear friend Alaena Haber of Grazed and Enthused. Our dream with this book is to create a resource that is completely accessible to everyone, regardless of your budget, time limitations, or access to specialty grocers. These recipes re-create some of your favorite flavors, but the processes are simple and the ingredients are super common. I know it is going to be such a cool resource for so many people!

I’m giving away over $2000 in kitchen tools and gift certificates below (internationally!)!  Make sure to read down to the bottom of this post to enter!

Here is the official description of The Healing Kitchen:

Achieving health through nutritious food choices has never been simpler nor more delicious thanks to The Healing Kitchen!

Armed with more than 175 budget-friendly, quick and easy recipes made with everyday ingredients, you get to minimize time and effort preparing healthful foods without sacrificing flavor! Straightforward explanations and a comprehensive collection of visual guides will teach you which foods are the best choices to mitigate chronic illnesses, including autoimmune disease. Real-life practical tips on everything from cleaning out your pantry and easy ingredient swaps to reinventing leftovers and DIY flavor combinations will help you go from theory to practice effortlessly. Even better, twelve 1-week meal plans with shopping lists takes all the guesswork out of your weekly trip to the grocery store!

With half of all Americans taking at least one prescription medication (and 20% of us taking three or more!), there is a clear need for something to change. Combined with growing scientific evidence pointing to the Standard American Diet being at least partly to blame for our declining health, it’s time for a dietary shift toward nutrient-dense, anti-inflammatory whole foods that promote health, rather than undermine it. In the first part of The Healing Kitchen, you’ll learn all about what foods to eat and why, based on an ancestral diet template with contemporary scientific underpinnings. With a collection of practical tips and visual guides to distill this information into simple real-life actions that you can implement easily in your home today, this book is the closest thing to a guarantee of success that you can have when embarking on a Paleo diet healing protocol.
The Healing Kitchen features over 175 mouthwatering recipes that make eating healthful foods easy enough to fit even into the busiest of lives, while being so tasty you’ll likely forget you’re on a special diet to begin with! Compliant with the Paleo autoimmune protocol, every meal is budget-conscious, requires a minimal time commitment, uses no special equipment, and needs no hard-to-find ingredients—yet, the whole family will love it! There’s no need to suffer with bland or boring foods on your journey towards optimal health—and The Healing Kitchen is all about enjoying tasty food while nourishing your body.

The recipes span the gamut from easy peasy mains and simple sides to breakfast favorites and timeless treats. Even better, each recipe is labelled by cooking strategy, so you can easily identify meals that are one-pot, use 5 ingredients or less, take 20 minutes or less, can be made ahead, feature a slow cooker, and on-the-go foods—to make planning your day effortless! The Healing Kitchen also includes twelve weekly meal plans, each with a shopping list, to help you get completely organized in your kitchen! Even better, the selection of thematic meal plans hone in on your individual needs. Can’t spend more than 20 minutes cooking at a time? The 20-minute-or-less meal plan makes sure your time spent preparing food is as minimal as possible. Always eating on the run?  The on-the-go meal plan will suit your needs perfectly. Have a whole crew you need to satisfy? The family-favorites meal plan will please kids and grown-ups alike. Want to do all of your cooking for the week in one afternoon? Two batch-cook meal plans complete with exclusive web links to companion How To cooking videos will help you get it done!

The Healing Kitchen is your best tool for turning your kitchen into healing central—all while minimizing your time commitment, keeping your food budget reigned-in, and enjoying bite after delicious bite of meals to nourish and thrive.

Exciting, right?

About The Healing Kitchen

The idea for The Healing Kitchen came about while Alaena was living in Atlanta last winter while doing a practicum for her occupational therapy degree.  She and her husband Jeff were over at our home for dinner one night and we got talking about how fun it would be to work on a cookbook together.  The ideas came so quickly that by the end of an hourlong the conversation, we had the entire book mapped out even including a list of infographics, like this one!

The_Healing_Kitchen_illustrations-12We got to work right away, with a divide-and-conquer approach.  It was so wonderful to be working on one part of the book, while knowing another one is coming together too.  There were plenty of collaboration meetings in between too, lots of “please look at this” and “what do you think of this?”, and even more laughing and eating of delicious food!

The recipes were all created with with the goal of being very approachable, easy-to-make, quick-to-prepare, budget-conscious, don’t require any special kitchen equipment, and only use ingredients that can be easily found in most grocery stores–all while being super tasty!  We tried to hit a large range of comfort food favorites, and make sure that every single recipe tastes special.  And, this cookbook contains over 175 of them!

THE HEALING KITCHEN 1000-128+129spread
Alaena did all of the recipe photography for The Healing Kitchen too, and she knocked it out of the park!  Her photos are so beautiful, and lend to the lovely airy and relaxing feel of the whole book!

We wanted to make sure The Healing Kitchen was really easy to navigate too.  Each chapter has its own Table of Contents, plus, there’s a Thumbnail Index, a cooking strategy index, and a general index!  Check out some of the amazing recipes in the book:THE HEALING KITCHEN 1000-334+335spread
THE HEALING KITCHEN 1000-336+337spread

The whole goal of The Healing Kitchen is to make the AIP super accessible, which meant both creating the right type of recipes but also presenting the Autoimmune Protocol in a new, simpler way than The Paleo Approach (from a much more guttural, nutrient-focused, common sense and quasi-political perspective with a little seasoning of science!). The 104 pages of introductory material before the recipes even start include an entirely new outline of the Autoimmune Protocol, including some material that wasn’t covered in The Paleo Approach, written for a general audience.

THE HEALING KITCHEN 1000-12

It was also really important to both Alaena and I to have a really visually appealing and organized book. For the introductory material, that meant creating a ton of fun infographics like this one showing the most important nutrients for immune health, along with which foods are the best sources (note the EPA and DHA fist bump!)! Those nutrients are all also described in more detail, in the book.

THE HEALING KITCHEN 1000-42+43spread

We also wanted to create tons of practical organizational tools, with the goal of making following the Autoimmune Protocol as easy and stress-free as possible.  That included a large range of infographics, like this grocery store map:

THE HEALING KITCHEN 1000-58

Another thing we did to help the reader get crazy organized was to create 12 meal plans for this book (with shopping lists labeled so that you can buy everything in one weekly trip, or if you prefer to shop for groceries twice a week, you can easily see what to buy at which shopping trip!)! Four of the meal plans are general and the other eight are thematic.  Ooh, and two of those meal plans are going to have How-To cooking videos to go with them! Alaena and I had so much fun creating this cookbook for you, and we can’t wait to see what you make!!!

THE HEALING KITCHEN 1000-78+79spread

I hope you can see why Alaena and I are so excited about The Healing Kitchen!  I know that our colleagues in the Paleo and Real Food movements who have had the opportunity to preview our book already all had glowing things to say!

THE HEALING KITCHEN 1000-351THE HEALING KITCHEN 1000-352

The Healing Kitchen releases December 15th, 2015 and will be available from all major booksellers!  It will also be available on all major e-book platforms, including kindle, iTunes, nook, and kobo.

Please Consider Pre-Ordering

Please consider pre-ordering The Healing Kitchen from Amazon.com, BarnesAndNoble.com or from your local book store. When you pre-order, you support us because book stores base their orders on pre-order numbers.  The more pre-orders, the more copies book stores stock, the bigger the displays, the greater the visibility, the more people we can reach and the greater the momentum of our book.  That all translates to being able to help more people regain their health! Pre-ordering The Healing Kitchen is quite simply the single best thing you can do to support me.

You also get an important benefit when you pre-order from Amazon.com:  it guarantees that you pay the lowest price.  Amazon prices fluctuate hourly, but you pay the lowest price the book drops to between the time you order it and when you receive it.  And right now, Amazon is already selling The Healing Kitchen for 40% off!!!!

CELEBRATION GIVEAWAY!

The Healing Kitchen started printing yesterday! So, to celebrate this amazing achievement, I’m giving away THREE prize packages to my readers! No restrictions apply as this giveaway includes prize packages that can be shipped internationally!!!!

These prize packages total over $2000 in value and are packed with some of my favorite ingredients and tools that you’ll find used in recipes throughout The Healing Kitchen. Check out the prize packages and enter to win using the entry form below!!!

THK Giveaway 1Prize Package #1: $1,190 value

THK Giveaway 2Prize Package #2: $525 value

THK Giveaway 3Prize Package #3: $285 Value

Entering is super easy!  Just follow the instructions below! All of the entries are optional and entering can be as easy as commenting on this post!  No purchase is necessary (although it’s appreciated!), and this giveaway is open to readers from anywhere in the world!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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This Week in Paleo: Adventures in Mayonnaise Making

We’ve all been there…

I would bet money that every person who has done the paleo thing has tried to make mayonnaise.

“It will be easy!” they said.

Articles abound which claim their method to be fool-proof.

But I spent twenty minutes last week with the obnoxious sound of a blender at full blast carefully pouring only the tiniest sliver of olive oil into it’s spattering spout, only to be left with a liquidy, un-emulsified mess.

And I just don’t have the patience!

If you can put up with the aching of your triceps, then more power to you!  Making your own mayo is definitely economical.

But sometimes I just want the creamy, tangy deliciousness of mayo without all the hassle and cleanup.  

Can you relate?

I don’t know about you, but I desperately miss the convenience foods of the Standard American Diet (SAD).  I miss the pre-packaged cookies and the frozen pizzas.  I miss the way immediate sustenance (however disgusting, damaging, and gut-irritating it was) was just at my fingertips.

Sometimes (most of the time!) I just don’t have it in me to cook.  

After a long night of dancing and a long day of studying, I’m worn out, exhausted, beat, and the thought of making mayonnaise couldn’t be further from my mind.

That’s one of the reasons I’m so grateful for the success of my fellow bloggers and the mainstreaminess (probably not a word!) of paleo.

People are talking about us!  And that means companies are creating convenience products. 

Some of these products you can trust and some you can’t.  But for mayonnaise at least, I use one of the most trustworthy sources I know: Mark Sisson.

Mark of Mark’s Daily Apple has been blogging about the primal/paleo way of living and eating since the very early days.  He has built up an impressive company with bestselling books like The Primal Blueprint (find it on Amazon here) and The Primal Blueprint Cookbook (find it here), Quick and Easy Meals (one of my absolute favorites- find it here) and more.

I don’t always agree with everything he has to say, but I respect his knowledge, influence, and intelligence.

Speaking of bestselling books, have you read mine ;)?? Find Sexy By Nature on Amazon here.

He’s also recently begun selling grocery fare and his Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Mayo (find on Amazon here) is a staple in my kitchen.  I make tuna and salmon salads with it, use it in baking and cooking, and just generally love it.

The flavor of this mayo is awesome.  It has the same texture as your old favorite mayo and a VERY similar flavor.

Like, I can hardly tell the difference except to say that the Primal Kitchen Mayo tastes real and doesn’t have that chemically, icky taste so common in SAD convenience foods.

There are no chemicals in this mayo and it is paleo friendly.  In fact, avocado oil is actually a better choice for mayonnaise!

Extra virgin olive oil has too strong a taste and scandal abounds over olive oil in the United States.  Did you know that most imported olive oil and a lot of domestic olive oil is actually cut with canola oil?

If you use olive oil, you should be aware that you may be ingesting seed oils without even knowing.  (For safety with olive oil, choose a california grown olive oil that you can trust- I like this one)

So after I got it into my head that I wanted to make mayonnaise.  And after I realized I don’t care enough to spend the time making mayonnaise, I ordered some more Primal Kitchen Mayo and stocked up.

Try it!  I think you will seriously love it.  Buy it on Amazon here.

And if you already have or you have an easier way of making mayo that you want to share, let me know in the comments below!

 

——–

So, just as a heads up – some links above may be my affiliate links, which means I get a small commission if you click on it and make a purchase. Doing so is no additional cost to you, but helps me tremendously. Your support is SO greatly appreciated, so thank you in advance if you choose to do so. Check out my entire disclosure to know exactly how things work.

The post This Week in Paleo: Adventures in Mayonnaise Making appeared first on Paleo for Women.

I Have Never Felt So Free and in Control of My Health

It’s Friday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. I’ll continue to publish these each Friday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading!

real_life_stories_stories-1-2My story? A journey to say the least. I have come to learn there are literally millions of people caught up in the same vicious cycle I was stuck in. My entire life from the age of eight years old—yes, I was on a “diet” at the age of eight—my weight was up and down continuously, sometimes dramatically up and down. I tried just about every diet on the market, weight loss aids, appetite suppressants, supplements, cleanses, you name it and I probably had tried it. I had gone as far as starvation diets, and countless hours in the gym. Yes, I had times where I was lean, weight was down, I even did some modeling in my 20s but I did not “feel good.” I constantly had health problems from chronic physical illness to an anxiety disorder early in life. I tortured my body in pursuit of looking good, “being lean.” It was a full time job, trying to reach this image/goal/desire.

Before_black dressBy age 40, I found myself fat, unfit, depressed and miserable. I had sky-high blood pressure requiring various heart and blood pressure medications. The doctor’s answer was to slap on medication and follow-up. What the? Alrighty then. I was under tremendous work stress, having family issues, financial struggles, balancing life with a new “blended” family. You name it, I was struggling in all areas like most of us today do. When I thought it was bad enough, I suffered a tragic loss. My younger brother, whom I was very close with died in a tragic accident. I found myself in the bottom of a bottle of alcohol and I stayed there, diluted for quite some time. I could not handle my reality. I continued to spiral down in a deep depression until I finally saw myself for what I was becoming. I was not the mom, wife, friend or family member I once prided myself as being.

It was time to take charge of my existence, take charge of my health, take charge of my future. At this point, I was desperate for better health. It was no longer about wanting to “get skinny” or look good. It was about creating a “NEW” reality. I began studying conventional nutrition to see what I could do to help myself. I was employing Holistic – Vegan practices and working out. Within one month I no longer needed medication and was down 20 pounds. I was fired up!!! BUT – soon the weight loss plateaued and I always felt a bit weak and tired and HUNGRY! After I became a certified Holistic consultant, I decided to continue my education and took on Sports Nutrition. I changed my diet again and followed a Sports nutrition regimen and took on a challenging physique sculpting program. I got some very slow results, but wow was it difficult. I lived by meal timing, portion control, agonizing constant macro-nutrient counting and many days of frustration with still not getting results I was looking for. I received my Sports Nutrition consulting certificate but still felt lost, I was doing everything text book but it still was not working!

I was on to more healthful lifestyle practices and making slow changes to my body, but I still did not feel right and I did not feel I was on to the right path. I remembered that I had tried The Primal Blueprint a few years prior. I treated it like a fad diet just like everything else in my past. I felt good and lost weight but I fell back into old habits fairly quickly. I did not understand the high fat concept as fat is vilified in our “heart-healthy” low-fat, grain laden conventional wisdom of today. So, the controversy was my excuse to eat grains again, because quite frankly, I liked them. Man, did my health later reflect I had gone back to old ways! With all my recent education, I thought I should look at The Primal Blueprint again since I was on this mission to take charge of my health.

The decision to look at The Primal Blueprint again was life changing! I nearly effortlessly began to lose that stubborn body fat, toned up and was feeling good, strong, happy, energized and sleeping well for the first time in my life. I wanted more, more… I knew the Primal lifestyle was the path I was looking for. I decided to enroll in The Primal Blueprint Expert Certification so that I could get an in-depth education on the “why”. I loved that the Primal Blueprint philosophy was all backed by science. Trust me, I employed countless hours of independent research and personal experimentation during this journey of finding better health.

I agree 100% with the Primal Blueprint lifestyle. I have never felt so fantastic, been as physically fit, energized, focused, relaxed and calm. The fact that my cholesterol, blood pressure and resting heart rate are fantastic is just tangible proof I am on the correct path. In fact, my HDL was SO impressive at my last vitality check, the doctor was extremely interested, and wanted extensive detail of what I do… The best thing of all is that I am full of energy to be the best mom and wife I can be. I play with the kids, I’m happy and engaged with life again. I am setting a good example for my children and creating a healthy existence for them. I don’t think there is any greater satisfaction in this world than that! My husband is completely committed to the Primal lifestyle as well, feels fantastic and has made quite a transformation himself!

before after

I have never felt so free and in control of my health, and for that I am eternally grateful. I cannot express my gratitude enough for the work of Mark Sisson and the wonderful Primal staff. Not only did I get the tools I needed to reshape my life, all those around me benefit because I can offer value to their lives now. As my journey continues, it is time for me to pay it forward. I am bounding with enthusiasm to help guide others in finding their way to better health. Now, my mission is to share what I have learned, my journey, my passion! I am forever a Primal Blueprint enthusiast!

Denise


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Fashion Fridays

Fashion Fridays

I love today. It’s fall, there’s a chill in the air but the sun still comes out, less people are in the park near my house so Jackson and I can run around like psychos, I’m able to cook constantly for the blog again, and I’m finally not traveling so I’m able to decorate the house now!! We painted an accent wall. That’s a lie, my fiancé did it while I was on book tour. What a peach, huh? It’s purple. Bold. Just trust me, ok? I found some decorations I want to put on that wall and found a local (I think they are local…) artist and bought one of the paintings to hang on that accent wall. And then we bought a dresser and a chest the other day. Time to get this house looking like a home since we’ve lived in it for 6 months already. Holy crap, I can’t believe it’s been 6 months. So cool. OH and we booked our flights to Jamaica so we will definitely be at our own wedding! Good week, good solid week.

But who cares about everything I’m gleeful with excitement about. Let’s talk about outfits!! It’s officially transition time here on the blog. No more hot days. Now it’s all about long sleeves, booties, and scarves. Oh my love for scarves. Fall is by far my favorite season because I can wear scarves with any outfit and be 10x warmer than I would be without it. Who needs a jacket when you have a scarf?! This outfit below is all about the plaid. Plaid is so in this year, but this plaid shirt is by far the best because it is SO soft and is a little longer in the back to cover the butt.

IMG_9229

{ Plaid Button Up | Tank | Jeans | Lace Up Ballet Flats | Sunglasses}


I’m not much of a turtleneck wearer. But when I felt how soft this sweater was and noticed it was longer in the back, I knew it needed to be in my closet. This sweater will be perfect all winter long and would look great with any jacket! AND it comes in 6 different colors! I wore this sweater with a leather jacket to a college football game out in the wind in Nebraska and stayed warm the whole time!!

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Turtleneck Sweater | Jeans | Fringe Booties | Statement Necklace }


You know what annoys me? When people say you can’t wear white after labor day but then don’t know why. A girl let me know that it was bad to wear white after Labor Day but when I asked her who said that…silence. I don’t care what about a rule some human pulled out of their ass, I’m going to wear what I want, when I want. Including the best white jeans of all time that are always super comfortable, no matter what time of year. Dress it in some fall colors like olive and burnt orange and BOOM, you got yo’self a post Labor Day fall outfit. This blanket scarf is definitely my favorite one of the season, as you’ll notice it again below!
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3/4 Sleeve Top | Jeans | Plaid Scarf | Booties | Jacket }


The two outfits below are what I dress like on a daily basis. Remember, I work from home, by myself, then go to the gym, so my outfits include workout clothes, comfy t-shirts, and my favorite scarves that I get at Lululemon. I think I have 5 or 6 of these vinyasa scarves because they are truly the most comfortable. If you have a lululemon near you, head into the store because they always have different items online then what they have in store, so you can often find more things in the store! But what other things I’m LOVING right now are mesh cut out fitness apparel. These pants were found at a lululemon, but I heard they were a special edition, so I’m linking 5 mesh cut out capris/pants in all price ranges so you can sport some similar ones in and outside the gym!

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Top | Similar Jacket | Similar Mesh Pants : $120$110$108 – $58 – $42 | Sneakers | Vinyasa Scarf Option One and Two }


Yet another normal daily outfits. But these faux leather looking capris are so damn cool looking, I want to wear them every day! And they come in black too! Get these before they are gone because they are seriously so warm and perfect for winter!
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Top | CaprisSneakers | Vinyasa Scarf Option One and Two }


Onto a little more fun kind of outfits. I wore this vest while on book tour and wasn’t sure when I would wear it again. SO glad I pulled it back out of the closet and decided to take a chance pairing it with my favorite plaid scarf. I wasn’t sure if the look would come together, but I loved it. And even on a chilly day in Colorado, I wasn’t cold at all because of my super warm blanket scarf and leather leggings. I bought these leggings and platform booties last year, so I found a bunch of different options for you guys in all price ranges! But seriously, get this vest, it’s so fun and not expensive at all!
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{ Similar Top One and Two | Vest | Scarf | Faux Leather Legging Options: $98 – $70 – $60 $58 | Leather Bootie Options: $98$80 – $60 }


I was at Inspyre Boutique here in Denver recently where I found these flare jeans, this crop top AND this hat! So if you are in the Colorado area, visit one of their 4 locations and find these exact pieces. If not, I have lots of options for you in all price ranges! These jeans are so comfortable, soft and super stretchy so they don’t squeeze in all the wrong places. I know not everyone is into the crop top look, so I also linked a longer olive suede crop top that shows less skin! Either way, invest in some long flare jeans, wear some tall heels and feel like your legs are 10x longer! PS – These peep toe booties just went out of stock yesterday at Express so I’ve linked 3 similar pairs that I looooove!

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{ Flare Jeans Options: $53 – $59 – $70$78 – $88$98 | Olive Suede Crop Top Options: $12 – $17 – $22 | Similar Hat | Sunglasses | Jacket | Purse Options: One and Two | Booties Options: One Two and Three }


Happy Friday, Happy Shopping and Happy Halloween you awesome people!!

TPV Podcast, Episode 167, Meatpocolypse

Ep. 167, Meatpocolypse

On this episode of The Paleo View, Stacy and Sarah discuss the press release that was recently shared by the World Health Organization on processed and red meat consumption that has essentially created a meatpocolypse amongst all!

The Paleo View TPV 167 Meatpocolypse

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The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 167, Meatpocolypse

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:56)
    • Stacy’s good news, the celebrity who shared Beyond Bacon in their cookbook collection
    • Stacy’s bad news, an injury over the weekend
    • The printing schedule with The Healing Kitchen, and how Sarah is managing her time and protecting her health despite a very stressful timeline
  • The Thing (12:41)
    • Monday morning of this week, the World Health Organization published a statement in The Lancet classifying red meat and processed meat as carcinogens
    • A working group completed a literature review, and based on that review and a majority opinion, have decided to label processed meats as an international agency for research on cancer group 1 carcinogen, which means it is a confirmed carcinogenic to humans; and they have decided to label red meat as a group 2A carcinogen, meaning it is likely carcinogenic to humans
    • They came up with these labels based on a majority, although not uniform; from studies linking high processed and red meat consumption with colorectal cancer
    • Even in their statement they sort of say ‘despite the fact that this has never been confirmed or explained in animal studies’
    • Basically the press release led the media stories to say that bacon will kill you, and essentially sparked a social media battle between vegetarians/vegans and meat lovers
    • The reasons this has escalated into a very heated debate very quickly
    • The statements that Stacy has seen from meat vendors
    • The confusion that comes from all the various pieces of information in the media
    • Sarah thinks that the information that the World Health Organization recommends tends to be on the money, which is why this statement caused such a to-do, because this is such a reputable organization making such a strong statement
    • We expect the World Health Organization to be objective
    • Sarah recommends that people check out her blog post from the summer on the link between meat consumption and cancer
    • Sarah feels that the science on meat consumption shows that we need to come up with a more complete definition for carcinogenic
    • There are really four mechanisms that are possible explanations on why processed and read meat consumption may cause cancer, and at least three out out of four of those explanations are missing the link between meat consumption and cancer when you are eating at least five servings of vegetables a day
    • When we are talking about the meat and cancer link, all of the compounds in meat that have been linked to cancer are no different depending on how that meat is raised – so unfortunately they are in both conventional and grass-fed meat, which creates a different platform for the discussion
    • The role that heme iron plays and the damage that it causes in the gut lining and cells
    • What happens with heme when chlorophyll is present – displaying what happens when you have a side of broccoli next to your steak
    • The cancer link doesn’t happen anymore when you consume vegetables with your meat, and so it starts to be that high meat diets don’t cause cancer – its start to be that high meat diets that are simultaneously low in vegetable content are creating an environment in which cancer is more likely to grow
    • As soon as you add vegetables you are basically negating the high cancer risk of meat consumption, which you see in many scientific studies
    • High vegetable consumption is linked to a lower risk of every chronic illness, with the ideal number of servings per day being five
    • It is because of this information that Sarah feels you cannot uniformly say that meat causes cancer, because it is a very specific situation where meat is carcinogenic
    • The conversation should not demonize meat, but instead open the door for a discussion about why it is important to have a balance of vegetables and protein on our plates and why it actually improves health and reduces the risk of this link to cancer
    • Stacy finds that it is interesting that so much emphasis is being placed on processed meat, and that we need to take a step back and discuss what processed meat is and understand if/how the carcinogenic factor of the food is being altered
    • There are so many beneficial things to meat that are never discussed
    • Stacy feels that the information isn’t truly representative of what these leading organizations know to be true, which is really unfortunate because this has led to so much confusion
    • Sarah feels like the opportunity to educate the general public is being completely missed, that we are trying to shortcut the science for the general public, assuming that they don’t want the resources and tools to make informed choices
    • How can we expect to make any change without changing how we communicate health information, the rules approach does not work
    • The choice in this situation isn’t don’t eat bacon, it is have some vegetables on the side
    • We are constantly asking people to make these choices of deprivation, and the consequences this creates can be seen all around us
    • We need to help people understand what to eat, not just what not to eat, and to explain why
  • Stacy’s thoughts on all the ways you can get in your five servings – and don’t forget that most of the compounds in fruit are also equally beneficial
  • When in doubt add more vegetables to your plate
  • Stacy and Sarah will be back next week with a great topic!
  • Old lady ways
  • A reward for when Sarah finishes her book
  • Thoughts on The Martian
  • Carving out time to read for fun
  • And remember, be careful what you read on the internet, that seems to be the common thing that we are learning
  • Outro (53:42)

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How to Cook with Lemongrass

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Confession: I was afraid to cook with lemongrass up until our recent trip to Vietnam. I was intimidated by this tough, lemon-scented stalk in part because one of my pals ended up in the emergency room when her knife sliced her finger instead of the stalk. But to be honest, I just didn’t know how to prepare it properly. 

After visiting Vietnam and eating dish after flavorful dish perked up with this fragrant stalk, though, I decided to figure out once and for all the best ways to prepare lemongrass for different dishes. And you know what? It’s pretty simple. In this quick post, I’ll show you how to teach that stalk who’s boss.

How to Stalk A Good Stalk:

Lemongrass can usually be found in the produce section of fancier grocery stores or your local garden-variety Asian supermarket. (Tip: Lemongrass is typically much cheaper and fresher at an Asian market ’cause it turns over more frequently.) These long stalks are sold in bunches or individually. Choose the ones that smell fragrant, have greenish exteriors, and are slightly pliable. Avoid the stalks that are dried out, brittle, and bruised. 

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Storage:

Wrap fresh lemongrass stalks in plastic wrap, and store them in the fridge for up to a few weeks. Alternatively, you can store the tightly wrapped stalks in the freezer for a few months.

How to Prepare Lemongrass:

You can use different parts of the stalk for different preparations, but you still need to trim the lemongrass the same way to get to the good stuff. 

I normally start by cutting off about an inch from the root end, and I also trim off the dried-out leaves at the top of the stalk. 

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

If you’re using the lemongrass in a stir fry, curry paste, or marinade, peel off the tough outer layers of the stalk until you’re left with the tender core. But if you’re using the whole stalk to flavor a soup or stew, you don’t need to be nearly as diligent ’cause you won’t be ingesting it.

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

If the lemongrass will be used in a marinade, curry paste, or stir fry, you just want to use the lower, tender part of the stalk (about 4-5 inches from the bottom). 

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Because you’ll be eating it, use a microplane rasp grater to grate trimmed lemongrass to make sure you don’t have any tough, stringy bits in your dish. (As I mention in our cookbook, I use a microplane to make ginger snow with frozen ginger, too.)

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

No microplane? No problem! You can pound the stalk with a meat pounder or a small cast iron skillet before mincing it very finely.

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

You need to cut against the grain of the fibers or you’re gonna get a bunch of stringy bits in your food.

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Alternatively, you can pound the chopped lemongrass in a mortar and pestle or blitz it with the rest of your marinade or curry paste ingredients in a blender or food processor.

If you’re using lemongrass stalks to flavor a stew or soup, cut the stalk into three segments…

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

…and bash the heck out of ’em. 

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

This way, the stalks’ll release their yumminess into whatever you drop them into! Please note that you don’t eat the lemongrass when you use them in this fashion—fish out the stalks before you serve the final dish (or warn your unsuspecting guests to do so).

How To Cook With Lemongrass by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Another great way to prepare lemongrass for stews and soups is to bash a trimmed stalk and tie it in a bow before plopping it into your pot. You can watch this helpful video from the folks at Saveur to see how it’s done.

Now go forth and spread the lemongrass love! 

Recipes to try:


Looking for more recipes? Head on over to my Recipe Index! You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPad® app, and in my New York Times- bestselling cookbook, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel 2013).

The What, Why and How of “Dispositional Mindfulness”

MindfulnessIt’s okay to do the double take—dispositional mindfulness. How’s that?

By now most people have heard of mindfulness meditation. I’ve written a bit about it for the blog, also noting that other forms of deep relaxation practice tend to work better for me. As quiet blocks of time devoted to emptying the mind and bringing awareness to your breath as well as other body sensations, meditation can clear away conscious thought and let us rest in a deep calm, triggering the feel-good, health-promoting hormonal effects of the body’s potent relaxation response. Research has shown regular practice for even just a couple months literally changes the brain’s structure and confers a whole host of health advantages. But what about the application of a mindful approach to everyday life rather than a particular “practice”?

What is “dispositional mindfulness”?

Dispositional mindfulness, as researchers define it, is simply a keen awareness and attention to our thoughts and feelings in the present moment. Although different people would describe it in their own terms, it can feel like a thoughtful attunement with what is going on inside the parameters of your mind and body—a conscious, registering layer between yourself and your experience. For some people it might feel like a sense of centeredness, of keeping one’s energy inside, fully in the present moment, with slow, self-aware, deliberate consideration. The mindful processing of emotional and physical sensations in this way can steer—sometimes purposefully, sometimes imperceptibly—responses and choices.

It isn’t hard to see how being dispositionally mindful would’ve enhanced Grok’s ability to survive. Being attuned to one’s thoughts and feelings would’ve likely resulted in more successful social interactions, more intuitive hunting or warfare decisions, keener perception of the effects of many influential cues (e.g. weather shifts, food reactions, etc.).

And, yet, the modern world we live in does about everything it can to dissuade us from this mindful approach. From the noise and visual overload that sinks us into tunnel-like detachment to constant distraction and multitasking, our lives run too often on automatic pilot. Just what are we missing?

The Health Benefits of Dispositional Mindfulness

Although it’s a relatively new branch of meditation/mindfulness research, studies are already suggesting some significant associations for both physical and mental health.

Study participants who scored high on the self-report Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) were healthier on four of the American Heart Association’s seven cardiovascular indicators (smoking avoidance, physical activity, body mass index—and belly fat, and fasting glucose) and on the overall cardiovascular health composite score.

Interestingly, because the experiment was part of the ongoing New England Family Study (NEFS), researchers had documentation of which participants had been overweight in their childhoods. Participants who had been normal weight as children but became obese as adults scored low on the MAAS. Researchers speculate that dispositional mindfulness as a consistent temperament influences the decision making processes related to health related choices—for example, the response to cravings or the decision to exercise.

In terms of mental health, research suggests that dispositional mindfulness can ameliorate the physiological effects of psychological stress. And particularly for those people who are at risk for depression, it might be a hinge point. Subjects who had been tested for neuroticism six years prior underwent assessment for both depressive symptoms and dispositional mindfulness traits. In those who tested low or moderate for dispositional mindfulness, the correlation of neuroticism and depression was significantly higher. According to researchers, this kind of mindfulness can moderate the development of depression associated with neuroticism through the ability to describe and process inner experience. 

How to Develop Dispositional Mindfulness

Although some people are naturally wired toward this type of keen self-awareness and present-focus, experts suggest it can be cultivated by anyone.

The Mindful Attention Awareness Scale is in the public domain. (You can access it here (PDF) and see how you fare.) The questions reflect various forms of staying in the present moment (e.g. “I find myself preoccupied with the future or the past.”), doing one thing at a time (e.g. “I find myself listening to someone with one ear, doing something else at the same time.”) and being in touch with your immediate feelings (e.g. “I could be experiencing some emotion and not be conscious of it until some time later.”).

Take each and practice one of these behaviors for a week to two weeks. Once you feel you’ve made significant progress, take on the next one for the same amount of time (longer or shorter as need be). Establish check-in times at set intervals each day (using a phone or computer alarm perhaps) during which you write about how you’ve been practicing that week’s mindful characteristic that day.

Additionally, you can take up a meditative/relaxation practice (whether sitting or active, like walking meditation, yoga, Tai Chi, meditative dance, etc.) that helps you intensively practice “flow” focus with the present moment. I’d argue that any activity which cultivates keen awareness of physical sensation or explores subtle emotional differentiation could potentially cultivate dispositional mindfulness if practiced regularly. The idea here isn’t any particular skill but subtle attunement. Since most of us in the modern culture are used to running on automatic, even making a regular commitment to deep self-care or slow living might help (and definitely won’t hurt) any efforts here. For some people, honing a meditative mindset within exercise might be a possibility.

For those of you who imagine you would still have issues coming down from your normal stressful, distracted frame of mind —guess what? There’s even a gadget now that helps gauge your breathing, a key indicator of stress level, and offers feedback to your phone or other device to help you ameliorate the effects with suggestions like “Take a breath.” It might be the momentary mindfulness coach you need. While I haven’t yet tried this tool, I’d be interested in hearing from any of you who have.

Thanks for reading today. Did you take the MAAS inventory? What elements of mindful or “present” living challenge you the most? Share your thoughts on dispositional mindfulness, meditative practices or anything else under the Primal sun. Have a good end to the week.


Shop Now

The What, Why and How of “Dispositional Mindfulness”

MindfulnessIt’s okay to do the double take—dispositional mindfulness. How’s that?

By now most people have heard of mindfulness meditation. I’ve written a bit about it for the blog, also noting that other forms of deep relaxation practice tend to work better for me. As quiet blocks of time devoted to emptying the mind and bringing awareness to your breath as well as other body sensations, meditation can clear away conscious thought and let us rest in a deep calm, triggering the feel-good, health-promoting hormonal effects of the body’s potent relaxation response. Research has shown regular practice for even just a couple months literally changes the brain’s structure and confers a whole host of health advantages. But what about the application of a mindful approach to everyday life rather than a particular “practice”?

What is “dispositional mindfulness”?

Dispositional mindfulness, as researchers define it, is simply a keen awareness and attention to our thoughts and feelings in the present moment. Although different people would describe it in their own terms, it can feel like a thoughtful attunement with what is going on inside the parameters of your mind and body—a conscious, registering layer between yourself and your experience. For some people it might feel like a sense of centeredness, of keeping one’s energy inside, fully in the present moment, with slow, self-aware, deliberate consideration. The mindful processing of emotional and physical sensations in this way can steer—sometimes purposefully, sometimes imperceptibly—responses and choices.

It isn’t hard to see how being dispositionally mindful would’ve enhanced Grok’s ability to survive. Being attuned to one’s thoughts and feelings would’ve likely resulted in more successful social interactions, more intuitive hunting or warfare decisions, keener perception of the effects of many influential cues (e.g. weather shifts, food reactions, etc.).

And, yet, the modern world we live in does about everything it can to dissuade us from this mindful approach. From the noise and visual overload that sinks us into tunnel-like detachment to constant distraction and multitasking, our lives run too often on automatic pilot. Just what are we missing?

The Health Benefits of Dispositional Mindfulness

Although it’s a relatively new branch of meditation/mindfulness research, studies are already suggesting some significant associations for both physical and mental health.

Study participants who scored high on the self-report Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) were healthier on four of the American Heart Association’s seven cardiovascular indicators (smoking avoidance, physical activity, body mass index—and belly fat, and fasting glucose) and on the overall cardiovascular health composite score.

Interestingly, because the experiment was part of the ongoing New England Family Study (NEFS), researchers had documentation of which participants had been overweight in their childhoods. Participants who had been normal weight as children but became obese as adults scored low on the MAAS. Researchers speculate that dispositional mindfulness as a consistent temperament influences the decision making processes related to health related choices—for example, the response to cravings or the decision to exercise.

In terms of mental health, research suggests that dispositional mindfulness can ameliorate the physiological effects of psychological stress. And particularly for those people who are at risk for depression, it might be a hinge point. Subjects who had been tested for neuroticism six years prior underwent assessment for both depressive symptoms and dispositional mindfulness traits. In those who tested low or moderate for dispositional mindfulness, the correlation of neuroticism and depression was significantly higher. According to researchers, this kind of mindfulness can moderate the development of depression associated with neuroticism through the ability to describe and process inner experience. 

How to Develop Dispositional Mindfulness

Although some people are naturally wired toward this type of keen self-awareness and present-focus, experts suggest it can be cultivated by anyone.

The Mindful Attention Awareness Scale is in the public domain. (You can access it here (PDF) and see how you fare.) The questions reflect various forms of staying in the present moment (e.g. “I find myself preoccupied with the future or the past.”), doing one thing at a time (e.g. “I find myself listening to someone with one ear, doing something else at the same time.”) and being in touch with your immediate feelings (e.g. “I could be experiencing some emotion and not be conscious of it until some time later.”).

Take each and practice one of these behaviors for a week to two weeks. Once you feel you’ve made significant progress, take on the next one for the same amount of time (longer or shorter as need be). Establish check-in times at set intervals each day (using a phone or computer alarm perhaps) during which you write about how you’ve been practicing that week’s mindful characteristic that day.

Additionally, you can take up a meditative/relaxation practice (whether sitting or active, like walking meditation, yoga, Tai Chi, meditative dance, etc.) that helps you intensively practice “flow” focus with the present moment. I’d argue that any activity which cultivates keen awareness of physical sensation or explores subtle emotional differentiation could potentially cultivate dispositional mindfulness if practiced regularly. The idea here isn’t any particular skill but subtle attunement. Since most of us in the modern culture are used to running on automatic, even making a regular commitment to deep self-care or slow living might help (and definitely won’t hurt) any efforts here. For some people, honing a meditative mindset within exercise might be a possibility.

For those of you who imagine you would still have issues coming down from your normal stressful, distracted frame of mind —guess what? There’s even a gadget now that helps gauge your breathing, a key indicator of stress level, and offers feedback to your phone or other device to help you ameliorate the effects with suggestions like “Take a breath.” It might be the momentary mindfulness coach you need. While I haven’t yet tried this tool, I’d be interested in hearing from any of you who have.

Thanks for reading today. Did you take the MAAS inventory? What elements of mindful or “present” living challenge you the most? Share your thoughts on dispositional mindfulness, meditative practices or anything else under the Primal sun. Have a good end to the week.


Shop Now